Sunday afternoon, November 2, at the Brattleboro Film Festival, two films at The Latchis:

  • 12 noon: My Name Is Salt. A 2013 film by Farida Pacha (India/Switzerland; documentary; with subtitles; 92 min.) Year after year as it has been for centuries, thousands of families move to a desert in India to extract salt from the earth. When the monsoon comes each year, their salt fields are washed away. The rhythm of their labor is exquisitely filmed as a lyrical celebration of their life. It’s a sensory experience, and crystalline, like the commodity of the title.
  • 2 pm: Patema Inverted (Sakasama no Patema Sakasama no Patema). A 2013 film by Yasuhiro Yoshiura (Japan; Sci-fi/Anime/Drama; Dubbed; ASL-Interpreted; 98 min.) It’s an upside-down world, literally, where the two teens, Eiji and Patema, discover each other and their alternate worlds that have opposing gravitational pulls. They set out to find answers, clinging together lest gravity tear them apart. This unique anime film is a beautiful wonder of detail and ingenuity. Yoshiura has created a truly mesmerizing metaphoric world.

Saturday, November 8, at Vermont Jazz Center, 7:00pm: Introduction to lyrics and the Kirtan form; 8:00pm: concert.
Kabbalah Kirtan concert, featuring Yofiyah: Song and dance fusion of Jewish, Middle Eastern and Indian melodies with call-and-response singing and instrumental accompaniment. Tickets $20 at the door, or in advance by check, call Faith Schuster (802) 464-2632, or by credit card at www.brattleborotix.com. Download a flyer about the event:991300_2.10_Yofiyah Poster 7

Sunday, Oct. 12, 5:00-9:30pm: Autumn Festival at Yagna Inn in Rockingham, VT
Below, a flyer for the Autumn Festival. [Image opens in a new window.]
Yagna Inn features a new inclusive space for the arts, nature, culture and the building of community spirit. The initial event is a celebration of autumn, harvest and creation
inspired by the festivals – Navratri and Diwali – and exploring common threads across
cultures. Activities for the opening event, all welcome, Sunday evening, October 12:

    a flyer for the Autumn Festival at Yagna Inn, Rockingham, Vermont, Sunday, October 12, 2014
  • an art exhibition of South Asian American artists
  • an interactive Autumn mandala using Vermont fall foliage and natural materials
  • 6:30pm: a vegetarian Indian buffet (call for reservations)
  • 7:30pm: a circle of music and dance – all welcome to participate, no prior experience needed – a cushion concert dedicated to Prakriti or nature as the Feminine energy of creation in the Universe.
  • 9pm: a circle of light: lantern lighting as the closing activity

Contact Prachi Dalal at Yagna Inn for more information or to RSVP:
802-463-0005 or prachi [at] somaiya [dot] com.
Directions to the event.




Monday, Sept. 8 2014, 5:30-8pm: Asian Cultural Center of Vermont (ACCVT) presents the 15th Annual

Mid-Autumn Moon Festival

(Zhongqiu Jie) which is celebrated in China, Korea, and Vietnam. After Lunar New Year, the second most important festival of the year. This is a traditional time for families to gather and give thanks for the harvest and for harmonious unions. Offerings may be made to Chang’e, the Moon Goddess of Immortality. This is the festival for carrying lanterns and sharing mooncakes. Come celebrate this harvest festival with crafts, stories, songs, food, t’ai chi, martial arts, and the rope tug. Then watch the harvest moon rise. The celebration started with a pot-luck. Location: Kiwanis Shelter atop Memorial Park Drive, Brattleboro, VT. All ages, rain or shine, this is a free event for all ages. Donations for ACCVT, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit educational agency are appreciated to help defray the cost of event coordination and space rental. For more information text (802) 579-9088 or call (802) 257-7898, ext. 1.
AutumnMoonFest2012aAutumnMoonFest2012bAutumnMoonFest2012cAutumnMoonFest2012dAutumn Moon Festival in Brattleboro AutumnMoonFest2012f AutumnMoonFest2012e





















2014 events scheduled to be presented by or in collaboration with Asian Cultural Center of Vermont (ACCVT):

  • For further information, contact: (802) 579-9088 or (802) 257-7898, ext. 1.
  • Monday, September 8, 5:30-8:30pm: the 16th Annual Mid-Autumn Moon Festival of China, Korea, Japan and Vietnam in Brattleboro, atop Memorial Park at the Kiwanis Pavilion.
  • Sunday, February 6, 1-3pm: Lunar New Year Festival of Korea, Vietnam and China, 157 Main St. at The River Garden in downtown Brattleboro.
  • Postponed to March 2015: Hinamatsuri, Japan’s Doll Festival at 814 Western Ave., West Brattleboro.
  • Sunday, March 23, 1:30-3:30pm: NawRuz (New Day) Celebration of southwest and central Asian, Persian, Sufi and Baha’i cultures at 1221 Bonnyvale Road, West Brattleboro (the house at Bonnyvale Environmental Education Center (BEEC). [Also known as No Ruz, Navroz, Nauryz, and Nowruz, depending on the language.]
  • Sunday, April 27, 1-2pm: World Tai Chi Day downtown, on the Brattleboro Common.
  • Friday, July 11, 5-8pm, during Gallery Walk: Tanabata-Obon, Japan’s double summer festivals in Brattleboro, observed on a single evening, in Pliny Park at the corner of Main and High Streets. (Please note that Gallery Walk is the 2nd Friday for this month only.)
  • Keep in touch for more events to be arranged.
  • ‘Friend’ us on Facebook for news of events and any date change. Check back here at the website for updated details.
  • Join ACCVT’s email list for emailed notifications of events.

2013 events presented by or in collaboration with Asian Cultural Center of Vermont (ACCVT):

  • Sunday, March 3, 1-3pm: Hinamatsuri, Japan’s Doll Festival at C.X. Silver Gallery, 814 Western Ave., West Brattleboro.
  • Saturday, March 16, 11am: Opening Reception for Hot Pot: A Taste of Contemporary Chinese Art, at Brattleboro Museum, 3/16/13 – 6/23/13. 10 Vernon St., downtown Brattleboro. More information on the Museum website.
  • Sunday, March 24, 1pm: NawRuz (New Day) Celebration of southwest and central Asian, Persian, Sufi and Baha’i cultures at C.X. Silver Gallery, 814 Western Ave., West Brattleboro. [Also known as No Ruz, Navroz, Nauryz, and Nowruz, depending on the language.]
  • Sunday, April 7, 2:30pm: “The Scent of Spring Flowers: Selections in Traditional Chinese Music and Dance”. Yabei Chen, Dance and Choreography, with Yan Li, Kevin Wang, and Hongyi Rafael Zhang on Di Zi (flute), Gu Zheng (zither), and Er Hu (2-stringed bowed instrument), at Brattleboro Museum, 10 Vernon St.
  • Saturday, April 20, 3pm: Martial Arts with Shifu Damon Honeycutt, at Brattleboro Museum.
  • Saturday, April 27, 8am-3pm: World Tai Chi Day in Brattleboro, at Crowell Lot, Western Avenue between Union and Green Streets.
  • Saturday, April 27, 3pm: Cooking Lessons with Cai, at Brattleboro Museum.
  • Sunday, May 19, 3pm: Chinese Calligraphy Book Making with Cai, at Brattleboro Museum.
  • Friday, August 2, 5-8pm, during Gallery Walk: Tanabata-Obon, Japan’s double summer festivals in Brattleboro, in Plaza Park at the foot of Main Street between the Museum and the Co-Op.
  • Thursday, September 19, 6:00-8:30pm: the 15th Annual Mid-Autumn Moon Festival of China, Korea and Vietnam in Brattleboro, atop Memorial Park at the Kiwanis Pavilion.
  • Friday, October 11, 6:00pm: Teaching English in Mongolia, a presentation by Ben Boettger – slides and music.
  • Keep in touch for more events to be arranged.
  • ‘Friend’ us on Facebook for news of events and any date change. Check back here at the website for updated details.
  • Join ACCVT’s email list for emailed notifications of events.

Friday, July 11, 5:30-8:30pm, Asian Cultural Center of Vermont (ACCVT) presented

Brattleboro’s Tanabata-Obon Festival 2014

downtown in Pliny Park, corner of High and Main Streets. This festival celebrates a Japanese tradition: the double festivals of summer in a single evening observance, downtown, during the July Gallery Walk (which is Friday July 11, 5:30-8:30. Obon is a celebration of ancestors and remembrance of loved ones and the departed. Tanabata is a star festival for communities to make wishes for the future (happening each year when the paths of two of the brightest stars, Vega and Altair, meet in the sky). The public is invited to walk a lantern-lit path to the Table of Remembrance.

For further information on Asian culture events in southern Vermont, including Tanabata-Obon, visit Asian Cultural Center of Vermont’s (ACCVT) website at accvt.org or contact ACCVT Executive Director Adam Silver at (802) 579-9088. Thanks to ACCVT Board Trustees Yasuko Parmenter and Michelle Mahin for coordinating this event.

Asian Cultural Center of Vermont (ACCVT) presents Tanabata-Obon in Brattleboro, 2011
There’s an album of images from the 2011 Tanabata-Obon event at:
www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.2371285643702.2141918.1297347508

Sunday, April 27, 2014, 1-2pm:

World Tai Chi Day in Brattleboro

Join Asian Cultural Center of Vermont for World Tai Chi Day in Brattleboro, Sunday, April 27, 1-2pm on The Common in downtown Brattleboro. For more information, contact Adam Silver, (802) 579-9088.
More information on this international event is at worldtaichiday.org.
Directions: At the north end of Main Street, beyond the courts, along Park Place (Route 5) between Putney Road and Linden Street.
GPS: The Common, Brattleboro, VT (or Brattleboro Common). 42.857633, -72.560656.

NoRuz / NawRuz: New Day, New Light, New Year in Persian and Central Asian Cultures:

Sunday, March 23, 2014, 1:30-3:30pm: Asian Cultural Center of Vermont (ACCVT) presents an annual introduction to this ancient and current multicultural festival. Nowruz is celebrated in many parts of Asia and by Asians worldwide coinciding with the Spring Equinox with activities for all ages around the focus of the spread (sofreh) of auspicious items. No Ruz (Persian for ‘New Year’ or ‘New Day’) has been observed for thousands of years by the ancient cultures of Persia (present-day Iran), and has been celebrated as ‘Nauryz’ and ‘Navroz’ for thousands of years up to today by many peoples, countries and faiths including (not limited to) Afghanistan, Azerbaijan, the Baha’i, Iraq, Iran, Kazakhstan, the Kurds, Kyrgyzstan, the Sufis, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, the Uighurs in N.W. China, Uzbekistan, and the Zoroastrians (Parsi). Activities for this Brattleboro event include: a pot-luck, readings from the Quran, the Baha’i Holy Writings and poetry by the Sufi poet, Rumi, and a review of the beginnings of No Rooz in the Asian world. There will be music, activities for children, learning Persian greetings and phrases to wish others well, and the tradition of sprouted grasses. There is also the customs of setting the special table or spread (sofreh) with seven plates or bowls containing items all beginning with the Persian sound ‘s’ and ‘sh’ all symbolizing peace, prosperity, growth and other auspicious meanings. NawRuz (No Ruz/Nauryz/Navroz/Nowruz) celebrates the arrival of Spring and is a thanksgiving celebration. Below is an example of the ACCVT sofreh:
a traditional spread (sofreh) to celebrate NoRuz in Persian culture and other Asian cultures; click on image to enlarge

  • Location: 1221 Bonnyvale Road, Brattleboro, VT, the building at Bonnyvale Environmental Education Center.
  • Time: Sunday, March 23, 2014, 1:30-3:30pm
  • Contact: ACCVT Trustee Michelle Mahin or ACCVT Executive Director Adam Silver – (802) 579-9088

Friday, October 11 2013, 6pm: Asian Cultural Center of Vermont (ACCVT) presented

A Year in Mongolia and the Gobi Desert by Ben Boettger

A slide lecture with an introduction to listening to a range of traditional and contemporary Mongolian music. Boettger, a former Peace Corps volunteer, will present a narrative of his first year in Mongolia accompanied by images. He first trained for three months in a small northern village living with a Mongolian family and then moved south to the southern mining/industrial town of Dalanzadgad in the Gobi Desert where he lived and taught for the rest of the year. He will talk about his students, Mongolian music, camel racing, and food, concluding with the celebration of Tsagaan Sar, the Mongolian Lunar New Year Festival. He will play a few songs to illustrate a range of Mongolian traditional and contemporary music including examples of khuumi throat singing, traditional instrumental music, contemporary Mongolian pop, and the modern folk/metal fusion band Altan Urag. Ben says, “Mongolia’s traditional music sounds like nothing else on Earth and it’s my favorite aspect of the culture, so I’d really like to give people a taste of it.” Location: 814 Western Avenue, West Brattleboro, VT. This is a free public event with no admission fee. Donations go towards the speaker’s honorarium. For more information call (802) 257-7898, extension 1.
Dalanzadgad, southern town in Mongolia, Gobi Desert

BenBoettger-NorthernMongolia-kiteflying









Thursday, Sept. 19 2013, 6-8pm: Asian Cultural Center of Vermont (ACCVT) presented the 14th Annual

Mid-Autumn Moon Festival

(Zhongqiu Jie) which is celebrated in China, Korea, and Vietnam. After Lunar New Year, this is the second most important festival of the year. This is a traditional time for families to gather and give thanks for the harvest and for harmonious unions. Offerings may be made to Chang’e, the Moon Goddess of Immortality. This is a harvest festival with crafts, stories, songs, food, t’ai chi, martial arts, and the rope tug, followed by watching the harvest moon rise. The celebration started with a pot-luck. Location: Kiwanis Shelter atop Memorial Park Drive, Brattleboro, VT. All ages.


Sunday, April 7, 2013, 3pm, Brattleboro Museum in collaboration with Asian Cultural Center of Vermont (ACCVT) presented

    The Scent of Spring Flowers: An Afternoon of Chinese Music and Dance

    In connection with its new exhibits featuring the work of internationally known Chinese artists, the Brattleboro Museum & Art Center (BMAC) in collaboration with ACCVT presents practitioners of traditional Chinese culture located right in its own backyard. On Sunday, April 7 at 3 p.m., BMAC presents “The Scent of Spring Flowers,” a program of traditional Chinese music and dance performed by students and faculty of Northfield Mount Hermon School (NMH in Gill, MA), all ages welcome. NMH students Yan Li, Kevin Wong, and Hongyi Rafael Zhang will play the erhu (two-stringed bowed instrument), guzheng (plucked zither), and dizi (transverse flute). Dance teacher Yabei Chen will perform a traditional dance with water-sleeves and fans. As a child in China, Chen practiced gymnastics, building a solid foundation for her flex­ibility. At the age of eight, she moved with her family to the United States, where dance came to play an important role in her life. An avid teacher and performer, Chen says, “I cannot picture my life without dancing. Dancing has enriched my life to an extent that it has become an essential part of me.”traditional Chinese music at Brattleboro Museum by students from Northfield Mount Hermon School

    Yabei Chen performing a fan dance with Chinese flute accompanying

    Yabei shows how to wear the Water Sleeves

    Yabei Chen performing the Water Sleeves dance

    Yabei Chen performing the Water Sleeves dance

    Yabei Chen performing the Water Sleeves dance








    Sunday, March 3, 2013, 1:00 – 3pm, Asian Cultural Center of Vermont (ACCVT) presented

    Hinamatsuri, Japan’s Doll festival in Brattleboro

    ACCVT-DollFestival_4117ACCVT-DollFestival_3750ACCVT-DollFestival_4112ACCVT-DollFestival_4109ACCVT-DollFestival_3746.jpg






    Asian Cultural Center of Vermont (ACCVT) presented

    Lunar New Year of China, Korea and Vietnam

    Vietnamese dragon on parade, Lunar New Year Fest Brattleboro 2011

    Vietnamese dragon, Lunar New Year Festival of Korea, Vietnam and China; the River Garden, Brattleboro 2011

  • At the River Garden, 157 Main St, downtown Brattleboro.
  • Sunday, Feb. 17, 2013, 1:00 – 3:30pm
  • 10th annual celebration in southeastern Vermont
  • It’s a potluck! Bring hors d’oeuvres, appetizers or refreshments to share and sample a wide variety of Asian and non-Asian treats.
  • Try singing a New Year’s song from East Asia.
  • Make a paper lantern or some origami.
  • Martial arts demonstrations by Kyoshi Patrick Donohue and his Brattleboro School of Budo.
  • Shifu Damon Honeycutt performed some martial arts with visiting students.
  • There was group Chinese exercise and calligraphy.
  • Korean tug-of-war.
  • Dance with the 30-foot Vietnamese Dragon. The dragon dance went outside for a loop around Main Street, a 10-minute parade.
  • This enormous marionette, requiring at least 9 people to hold it, is forever chasing the ‘heavenly pearl’ according to Chinese folklore. The pearl is symbolized by a wire globe mounted on a staff and decorated with tiny bells.
  • Seth Harter, Director of Asian Studies at Marlboro College, brought this extraordinary dragon back from the village of an accomplished Vietnamese craftsman. During the rest of the year, the dragon ‘lives’ at the Marlboro College.
  • You don’t have to be Asian or know anything about Asia to participate!
  • Don’t miss the 30-foot Vietnamese dragon, visiting around 3 o’clock.
  • View the pictures at Flickr of ACCVT’s Lunar New Year in 2011 when the celebration was also held at The River Garden. Another picture set of the festival at the River Garden also on Flickr dates from 2008.



Tuesday, January 1, 2013, 1-3pm, Asian Cultural Center of Vermont (ACCVT) presented

Shogatsu: Japanese New Year in Brattleboro

kadomatsu, the traditional Japanese decoration for entrances at the New Year

  • a gathering celebrating Japanese culture at the New Year
  • featuring activities for all ages
  • food, cultural games, art activities for kids
  • a Japanese tea ceremony
  • and more. Bring food to share for the potluck.

Shogatsu is the most important festival of the year for many Japanese people. It looms large for many Japanese people as Thanksgiving and Christmas does for Americans in the United States. It’s a time for family and friends to get together and, like American New Year, a time to make changes in one’s life and bring in the new in a variety of ways. For Vermont, it’s an opportunity to celebrate for the whole community, neighbors, relatives, fellow townsfolk and to experience different cultures’ celebrations noticing the similarities and the variety that makes for differences.

Until the 19th century, Shogatsu’s occurrence was based on the lunar calendar. Since the mid 19th century, Shogatsu has been celebrated annually on January 1st. ‘Sho’ means first and ‘gatsu’ means moon or month. Shogatsu means ‘first month’ or ‘New Year.’



Sunday, September 30, 2012, 5:30-8pm, Asian Cultural Center of Vermont (ACCVT) presented

Brattleboro’s 14th Annual Mid Autumn Moon Festival of
China, Korea and Vietnam



Friday, August 3, 2012, 5-8pm, Asian Cultural Center of Vermont (ACCVT) presented

Brattleboro’s Tanabata-Obon Festival 2012

Asian Cultural Center of Vermont (ACCVT) presents Tanabata-Obon in Brattleboro, 2011
There’s an album of images from the 2011 Tanabata-Obon event at:
www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.2371285643702.2141918.1297347508



Sunday, May 20, 2012, 1-3 p.m., Asian Cultural Center of Vermont (ACCVT) presented

Brattleboro Kite Festival of Japan, China and India

  • for all ages, rain or shine
  • Location: The Kiwanis Shelter atop Living Memorial Park
  • Craft Activities * Games * Calligraphy * Poetry * Music
  • Decorate koinobori, a giant carp-shaped windsocks or streamers.
  • Make Japanese, Chinese, or Indian kites
  • Bring your own kite to show and fly
  • Try Chinese and Japanese writing, calligraphy and poetry dedicated to the Spring.
  • Storytelling of tales about kites
  • Make an origami frog that hops and an eensy weensy spider that climbs.
  • This free event has a bake sale, plus, donations are welcome to help defray the cost of site rental and other programming expenses. Furthermore, donations are requested if acquiring or using kite materials provided at the festival.
  • This festival combines two children’s day festivals, Japan’s (Kodomo-No-Hi on May 5) and China’s (Ertong Jie on June 1). Kite flying is featured in several festivals of India during the year.
  • The purpose of these festivals is to value the personalities of children, consider their happiness, and thank their parents.
  • The carp has been traditionally chosen as the shape of the windsock or streamer in Japan because it symbolizes strength and success. In China, legend has it that the carp once swam upstream to become an auspicious dragon, the benefactor of the natural world and of the abundance of the world for which humans give thanks.
  • Photo album of the 2012 Kite Fest is on flickr at www.flickr.com/photos/asianculturevermont/sets/72157630739569994/.
  • Directions to Memorial Park Kiwanis Pavilion: From downtown Brattleboro and I-91, 1/4 mile west on Route 9 Western Avenue from I-91 exit 2. Left turn across the Citizens Bridge (next to the pedestrian-only covered bridge). Then, first right all the way up the winding hill, continuing past the baseball diamond on the left, and the pool and rink on the right. Once parking fills up at the top, park on one side of the drive that leads up to the top.



Friday, May 4th, 5-8pm, Asian Cultural Center of Vermont (ACCVT) will have a table during Gallery Walk in Harmony Parking Lot off Elliot Street in downtown Brattleboro as part of the Diversity Day festivities. There will be a bake sale and also, for a donation, henna decoration will be done.

Hina Ningyo Doll Festival Set Donated to ACCVT

With great appreciation, Asian Cultural Center of Vermont (ACCVT) has received a hina-ningyo display, The hina ningyo, a display of ornamental dolls for Japan's Hinamatsuri FestivalThe hina ningyo, a display of ornamental dolls for Japan's Hinamatsuri Festivala set of ornamental dolls that celebrate one of the most important festivals of Japan. The display, on a specially made platform, is recreated during the days leading up to Japan’s Hinamatsuri (Doll Festival) on March 3, celebrated for centuries to the present day. The Doll Festival is full of wishes for happiness, healthy growth and success. This display was donated to ACCVT by Hatsue Yokoi with thanks to Setsuko and Akio Ichinomiya for finding the display, preparing it and sending it to Vermont. Thank you to Yasuko Ichinomiya for setting up the display. The dolls have the traditional 9th to 12th century court dress of Japan’s Heian Period. The doll displays are generally heirlooms passed down within families. ACCVT is indeed fortunate to acquire this set and anticipates a display in mid to late February / early March of 2014. For more details and pictures of the individual dolls, visit the doll festival page.



Friday, April 6, 2012, 8:30pm, at Brattleboro Museum: How did sushi become a global cuisine? What began as a simple but elegant food sold by Tokyo street vendors has become a worldwide phenomenon in the past 30 years. Sushi: The Global Catch (75 mins.) (Special Jury Award Winner, 2011 Seattle International Film Festival) is a feature-length documentary shot in five nations that explores the tradition, growth and future of this popular cuisine. Beautiful raw pieces of fish and rice now appear from Warsaw and New York to football games in Texas towns. Can this growth continue without consequence? The first Friday of each month, following Brattleboro’s popular Gallery Walk, BMAC presents Art Films After Gallery Walk, screenings of cinematic gems for only $5. Location: 10 Vernon Street, downtown Brattleboro.
A film about sushi at Brattleboro Museum


NoRuz / NawRuz: New Day, New Light, New Year in Persian and Central Asian Cultures:

Sunday, March 18, 2012, Asian Cultural Center of Vermont (ACCVT) presented an annual introduction to this ancient and current multicultural festival. Nowruz is celebrated in many parts of Asia and by Asians worldwide coinciding with the Spring Equinox with activities for all ages around the focus of the spread (sofreh) of auspicious items. No Ruz (Persian for ‘New Year’ or ‘New Day’) has been observed for thousands of years by the ancient cultures of Persia (present-day Iran), and has been celebrated as ‘Nauryz’ and ‘Navroz’ for thousands of years up to today by many peoples, countries and faiths including (not limited to) Afghanistan, Azerbaijan, the Baha’i, Iraq, Iran, Kazakhstan, the Kurds, Kyrgyzstan, the Sufis, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, the Uighurs in N.W. China, Uzbekistan, and the Zoroastrians (Parsi). Activities for this Brattleboro event include: a pot-luck lunch, readings from the Quran, the Baha’i Holy Writings and poetry by the Sufi poet, Rumi, and a review of the beginnings of No Rooz in the Asian world. There will be music, activities for children, learning Persian greetings and phrases to wish others well, and the tradition of sprouted grasses. There is also the customs of setting the special table or spread (sofreh) with seven plates or bowls containing items all beginning with the Persian sound ‘s’ and ‘sh’ all symbolizing peace, prosperity, growth and other auspicious meanings. NawRuz (No Ruz/Nauryz/Navroz/Nowruz) celebrates the arrival of Spring and is a thanksgiving celebration. Below is an example of the ACCVT sofreh:
a traditional spread (sofreh) to celebrate NoRuz in Persian culture and other Asian cultures; click on image to enlarge


Sunday, January 15, 2012, 1 – 3:30 pm, Asian Cultural Center of Vermont (ACCVT) presented

the Lunar New Year Festival of Vietnam, Korea and China

  • in downtown Brattleboro at the Brattleboro Museum (BMAC),
  • 10 Vernon Street at the junction of Routes 5, 119 and 142.
  • Ushering in the Year of the Dragon,
  • this annual celebration begins with lots of food: it’s a potluck. Bring a dish or some refreshments to share, either Asian or non-Asian, whatever you can manage.
  • A craft and coloring table for younger children;
  • T’ai chi and Chinese exercises, martial arts demonstrations;
  • Group calligraphy mural, Lunar New Year song, and more;
  • the Dragon dancing in a community parade;
  • For further information, visit the event page
  • All ages are welcome to this free public event.


View of a Mercy Boat in the Irrawaddy Delta region of Myanmar, image from slide talk by Steev Lynn

a view from the Irrawaddy delta area of Myanmar

Slide Talk by Steev Lynn. February 17, 2011. Event location: 814 Western Avenue, West Brattleboro, VT.
Asian Cultural Center of Vermont (ACCVT) presented

“Land of Rice: Farming cultures in Assam and Myanmar’s Irrawaddy Delta”





Sundays February 20 – March 20, 2011, 5pm – 6pm, and continued into April! ACCVT’s collaborating partner and host was Luminz Studio.

Ritu Shree offered a Bollywood Dance workshop in Brattleboro

Ritu Shree presented Bollywood Dance workshops in Brattleboro

Bollywood Dance Workshops

with Ritu Shree
Asian Cultural Center of Vermont (ACCVT) and Luminz Studio Dance and Performing Arts Center presented Bollywood Dance Workshops with Ritu Shree, Sundays February to April in 2011 at Luminz Studio in Cotton Mill Hill. The first workshop was a big success; thanks to Darlene Jenson for hosting the space. Workshops the following month were continuing successes; thank you to Ritu for her time and sharing, to Aurora of Luminz Studio for hosting, and to Yasuko and Tony for the arrangements.

Instructor: In 2011, Ritu Shree was a Dance movement therapy and counseling student at Antioch University New England in Keene, NH. She has spent a major portion of her life dancing. She has learned and performed Classical Indian dance forms like Bharatnatyam and Kathak, later specializing in Jazz, Bollywood and Modern dance. Ritu has been learning and performing for more than 15 years, has taught many dance classes, and trained college dance teams (India) in Jazz, Bollywood and modern dance.